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  • The Importance of Clipping Dogs’ Nails

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    Why keeping a dog’s nails short and sweet should be a top priority for all dog owners.

    Let’s get this out of the way first: Nobody, it seems, likes to “do” dog nails. Not you, not the dog, nor anyone else who may be called upon to take on nail-clipping for you (such as a technician at your local veterinary hospital or even a professional groomer). But for the health of your dog, it must be done, and should be done frequently enough to keep your dog’s nails short.

    This isn’t an article about how to make nail cutting a more pleasant experience for you and your dog; this magazine has run plenty of those (see list at right). Don’t be tempted to skip that step: You should read up on positive reinforcement and desensitization techniques before you even think about snipping; of course your dog should be comfortable with having his feet touched and manipulated before you attempt any type of nail trimming. If he is not – and especially if he shows signs of serious distress or aggression – consult a qualified dog behavior specialist to help you modify this behavior. Better safe than sorry.

    No, this article is what you’ll need to know before you have appropriately and positively introduced your dog to the nail-cutting experience. I hope to convince you to commit to a regular nail-maintenance program for your dog.

    Why Dogs Need Their Nails Trimmed

    When dogs spend a good deal of time outdoors, running on various hard surfaces,1 including concrete and blacktop, their nails are gradually worn down, and they have less of a need for formal nail-grooming sessions. But today, with many suburban and urban dogs increasingly confined indoors when their owners are at work, and running mostly on soft surfaces such as lawns when they are outdoors, this welcome friction is often absent in their daily lives.

    Long, unkempt nails not only look unattractive, but over time they can do serious damage to your dog (not to mention your floors). When nails are so long that they constantly touch the ground, they exert force back into the nail bed, creating pain for the dog (imagine wearing a too-tight shoe) and pressure on the toe joint. Long term, this can actually realign the joints of the foreleg and make the foot looked flattened and splayed.

    Again, this isn’t just an aesthetic problem, it’s a functional one: Compromising your dog’s weight distribution and natural alignment can leave her more susceptible to injuries, and make walking and running difficult and painful. This is especially important in older dogs, whose posture can be dramatically improved by cutting back neglected nails.

    In extreme cases, overgrown nails can curve and grow into the pad of the foot. But even if they are not that out of control, long nails can get torn or split, which is very painful and, depending on severity, may need to be treated by a veterinarian.

    And in the end, unattended nails create a vicious cycle: Because the extra-long nails make any contact with his paws painful for the dog, he avoids having them touched, which leads to unpleasant nail-cutting sessions, which makes both human and dog avoid them, which leads to longer intervals between trims, which leads to more pain.

    The Basics of Clipping Dog Nails

    So what’s the goal? What’s the “right” length? While some breeds (most notably the Doberman Pinscher) are often shown with nails so short they can barely be seen, the most commonly accepted rule of thumb is that when a dog is standing, the nails should not make contact with the ground. If you can hear your dog coming, her nails are too long.

    The nails of mammals are made of a tough protein called keratin. Technically, dogs have claws, not nails, though we’ll use the latter term in its colloquial sense for this article. (The distinction is that nails are flat and do not come to a point. And if your nail is thick enough and can bear weight, it’s called a hoof.)

    Dog’s nails differ from ours in that they consist of two layers. Like us, they have the unguis, a hard, outer covering in which the keratin fibers run perpendicular to the direction in which the nail grows. But unlike us, under their unguis, dogs have the subunguis, which is softer and flaky, with a grain that is parallel to the direction of growth. The faster growth of the unguis is what gives the dog’s nail its characteristic curl.

    In addition to one nail at the end of each of the four toes usually found on each foot, many dogs also have a fifth nail, called a dewclaw, on the inside of the leg, below the wrist. Some dogs are born with dewclaws in the front only; others are born with dewclaws on every leg. There’s a great deal of debate about whether these should be surgically removed; some breeders do this a few days after birth because they believe that the dewclaws are vestigial, and are likely to rip or tear if they are not removed. (Many shelters also do this surgery on dogs at the same time they do spay/neuter surgery.)

    Proponents of dewclaws argue that dewclaws are not vestigial, but indeed used to grip objects such as bones, and to provide important traction when a galloping dog needs to change direction. (Poke around Youtube and you can find videos of Sighthound lure coursing; they actually lay their entire forearms perpendicular to the ground when redirecting their momentum.) Even the floppy double-dewclaws of breeds like the Great Pyrenees are said to have some purpose (traction or a “snowshoe” effect in the snow).

    One thing is certain: If a dog has dewclaws, they need to be trimmed – perhaps even more often than nails that routinely touch the ground. Because the dewclaws rarely touch the ground and so aren’t worn down, they tend to be pointier than the other nails. But perhaps because dewclaws are so loosely attached to the forelimb, many dogs object to trimming them much less.

    The Canine Toenail Quick

    There’s a reason why the phrase “cut to the quick” means to deeply wound or distress: Running through the nail is a nerve and vein called the “quick.” Nicking or cutting this sensitive band of tissue is very painful for the dog – and messy for the owner, as blood often continues oozing from the cut nail for what seems like an eternity. (Keeping a stypic-powder product, such as Kwik-Stop, on hand can help promote clotting and shorten the misery. Or, in a pinch, try flour.)

    Shortening the nail without “quicking” the dog is easier said than done – unless your dog has white or light-colored nails, in which case, you’re in luck: The quick will be visible from the side, as a sort of pink-colored shadow within the nail. Avoid going near it. If you trim the nail with a clipper or scissors, trim a bit off the end of the nail, and notice the color at the end of the nail (in cross section). As soon as the center of the nail starts to appear pink, stop.

    You can’t see the quick in a black or dark-colored nail. With these nails, you have to be even more conservative about how much nail you trim off. After making each cut, look at the cross-section of the nail. If you see a black spot in the center – sort of like the center of a marrow bone – stop cutting. It’s likely your next slice will hit the quick.

    The longer a dog’s nails are allowed to grow, the longer the quick will become, to the point that taking even a very small bit of nail off the end “quicks” the dog. Then the goal becomes a matter of snipping or grinding the nails to get as close as possible to the quick, without actually cutting it. This is perhaps easiest to accomplish with a grinding tool (such as a Dremel), though it can be done with clippers, too, with practice. By grinding away the nail all around the quick – above it, below it, and on both sides – the quick has no support or protection, and within days it will begin to visibly recede, drawing back toward the toe.

    If a dog’s feet have been neglected for months (or, horrors, years) at a time, it might take months to shorten those nails to a healthy, pain-free length. But if you keep at this regularly, it should get easier for the dog to exercise. And the more he moves, the more his nails will come into contact with the ground in a way that will help wear the nails down and help the quicks to recede.

    Helpful Trimming Tools

    Nail clippers use blades to remove the tip of the nail. There are a couple of different styles to choose from, but no matter what type is used, their effectiveness is dependent on the blades being sharp and clean.

    Guillotine trimmers have a hole at the end, through which the dog’s nail is inserted; then, as the handles of the tool are squeezed together, an internal blade lops off the end of the nail in a fashion reminiscent of the execution device for which the trimmer is named.

    Some people find it easier to chop through thick nails with these clippers, but others find it difficult to thread each nail through the hole at precisely the right distance from the end of the nail, especially when the dog is wiggling or uncooperative. On the plus side, though, it’s fast and easy to replace the blade in guillotine-style clippers – in fact, most guillotine clippers are sold with replacement blades, which encourages an owner to swap out the blade as soon as the tool loses any effectiveness.

    Scissor- and plier-style trimmers are arguably easier to use, but need to be sharpened from time to time – and who knows how to do this, or where this service can be obtained these days? Many people find themselves discarding and replacing these tools as needed, instead.

    Grinders are relatively new to the world of canine manicures. So many owners discovered how easy it was to use that old hardware standby, the Dremel tool, that you’ll sometimes hear that brand name used as a verb, as in “I Dremel my dog’s nails.” Soon enough, pet-specific rotary grinders found their way to market – and now Dremel makes a pet-specific grinder, too.

    Regardless of the type of grinder you buy, make sure it is appropriate for your dog. Some cordless models might be perfectly adequate for a Papillon, but simply may not have enough oomph for trimming the thick, hard nails of a larger breed like a German Shepherd.

    Though Dremels and other grinders come with several different attachments, most owners opt for the sandpaper barrel. Change the sandpaper sleeve whenever you see it’s becoming worn.

    Be sure to acclimate your dog to the sound of the grinder, and then slowly introduce the tool, so that your dog is accustomed to the grinding sensation on his nails. Don’t keep the rotary tool stationery on one area of the nail, as the heat it generates can be painful for the dog.

    Be aware of dangling hair – both yours and your dog’s – and take care not to have it get entwined in the tool’s spinning drum. To protect your eyes, wear safety glasses. And because nail grinders can generate a good deal of nail dust, a disposable surgical face mask is a sensible idea as well.

    Nail Maintenance Routines are Crucial

    If this sounds like a lot of work, it is – at least initially, until you and your dog develop a nail-maintenance routine. And “maintenance” really is the name of the game; it’s far easier for you (and less painful for your dog) to maintain his short nails than to shorten nails that have gotten long, with the inevitable corresponding long quicks.

    If your dog’s nails have gotten too long, or you adopted a dog whose nails were too long, you need to really commit to frequent trimming to restore his foot health and comfort. Three to four days is probably the minimum amount of time that’s advisable between salon treatments that are intended to encourage the quicks to recede. Once a week is ideal if you want to gradually shorten your dog’s nails and eliminate all that clickety-clacking on your wood floors. And, depending on the rate at which your dog’s nails grow (and what sort of surface he exercises on) once or twice a month is a reasonable goal to maintain the nails at a healthy length.

    No matter what frequency you choose, make a commitment. Earmark a specific day of the week or month for your grooming sessions, and stick with it. You’ll have a better chance of remembering to do your dog’s nails on a regular basis if you get into a routine.

    It may also be helpful to dedicate a location in your home for doing your dog’s nails – somewhere comfortable for you and your dog and with a good light source. Make sure you have everything you need at hand before you begin: clippers, styptic powder and some tissue or a small clean towel or washcloth (in case you accidentally quick the dog), eyeglasses for you (if you need them to see well up close), and lots of small, high-value treats to keep the experience rewarding for your dog.

    It’s also smart to have a leash on your dog, even if he’s usually fine with having his nails clipped; many dogs will attempt to leave abruptly if they are “quicked.” And who could blame them? If you do make a mistake, don’t make a huge fuss. Feed your dog some treats, and proceed with more conservative clips.

    Source courtesy of Whole Dog Journal

  • 5 Ways to Keep Your Pet’s Teeth and Gums Healthy for Life

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    February is Dental Health Month, which means it’s time to lavish some attention on your pet’s teeth. It’s important to take proper care of canine and feline teeth, because if left untreated, plaque and tartar buildup can progress to painful periodontal disease. The bacteria from periodontal disease can spread to other organs and cause illnesses. More than 85 percent of cats and dogs over four years old are affected by periodontal disease — you don’t want your four-legged companion to become part of that alarming statistic.

    Here are five steps to help your pet’s teeth and gums remain healthy:

    1. Beware of Bad Breath
    If a musky scent is coming from Fluffy’s mouth, don’t ignore it. This could be a warning sign that she has periodontal disease or another oral disease such as stomatitis, a common feline condition that causes painful inflammation of the gums and mouth tissues.

    Other dental-health warning signs include bleeding gums, yellow or brown teeth, pawing at the mouth, and loose or missing teeth.

    2. Brush Your Pet’s Teeth
    While it might be difficult at first, with enough patience and plenty of yummy rewards, you can turn tooth brushing into a bonding experience with your dog or cat. It might take several weeks to train your four-legged friend to warm up to the toothbrush, so start by letting her smell the toothbrush and pet toothpaste, then gradually work your way to brushing for 30 seconds on each side of her mouth at least every other day. By the way, human toothpaste isn’t safe for pets, so be sure to use a product approved for your pet.

    If you’re scared your dog or cat will bite you, ask your veterinarian for alternative tartar-control options.

    3. Consider Dental Toys, Treats and Food
    While it’s not as effective as brushing your pet’s teeth, giving her treats, toys and food specifically designed to promote oral health will help her maintain healthy gums and teeth. Check for the Seal of Acceptance from the Veterinary Oral Health Council to make sure that whatever alternative you choose meets the standards for effective plaque and tartar control.

    4. Ask Your Vet for a Dental Exam
    Humans aren’t the only ones who need their chompers checked by a professional; your four-legged friend needs to have her teeth and gums checked by a veterinarian. During the dental exam, the vet will first take your pet’s medical history, then ask if you’ve noticed any dental health warning signs such as bad breath. Next, he’ll examine your pet, including checking the head and neck for any abnormalities. Finally, he’ll check out your pet’s teeth and gums for redness, bleeding and inflammation. He’ll also be on the lookout for tooth loss, cracked teeth, plaque and tartar, as well as potentially cancerous lumps and bumps.

    A cursory dental exam can usually be performed without sedation, unless your pet becomes aggressive or his teeth are very painful. For a complete dental evaluation, though, your pet will have to go under.

    5. Don’t Let Anesthesia Stop You From Getting a Dental Cleaning
    To thoroughly examine your pet’s teeth and gums, properly get rid of nasty plaque and tartar, and really clean your pet’s pearly whites, he’ll need to be anesthetized. Though sedating your dog or cat sounds scary, it’s not as bad as it sounds — in fact, the procedure has never been safer or more comfortable. Before your vet even begins anesthesia, he may recommend prescreening tests to help ensure that your pet is healthy enough for the procedure.

    When you think about it, the benefits of dental cleaning outweigh the possible risks of anesthesia. When Fluffy wakes up, her breath will smell better, and her teeth will be shinier and healthier. And as an extra bonus, maintaining healthy teeth and gums helps protect the body’s other organs, like the heart and kidneys, from the damaging effects of dental disease.

    *Source courtesy of Vet Street

  • Pet Obesity on the Rise for Sixth Straight Year

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    One of America’s most common New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, and statistics show that pet owners should share that goal with their dogs and cats. Data from Nationwide, the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance, reveals that pet obesity is on the rise for the sixth straight year. In 2015, Nationwide members filed 1.3 million pet insurance claims for conditions and diseases related to pet obesity, equaling a sum of more than $60 million in veterinary expenses. The boost in total obesity-related claims signifies a 23 percent growth over the last three years.

    Similar to their human counterparts, excessive body fat increases the risk of preventable health issues and may shorten the life expectancy of dogs and cats. Nationwide recently sorted through its database of more than 585,000 insured pets to determine the top 10 dog and cat obesity-related conditions. Below are the results:

    Most Common Dog Obesity-Related Conditions Most Common Cat Obesity-Related Conditions
    1.    Arthritis 1.     Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease
    2.   Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease 2.    Chronic Kidney Disease
    3.   Low Thyroid Hormone Production 3.    Diabetes
    4.   Liver Disease 4.    Asthma
    5.   Torn Knee Ligaments 5.    Liver Disease
    6.   Diabetes 6.    Arthritis
    7.   Diseased Disc in the Spine 7.    High Blood Pressure
    8.  Chronic Kidney Disease 8.   Heart Failure
    9.   Heart Failure 9.    Gall Bladder Disorder
    10.  Fatty Growth 10.   Immobility of Spine

    “Obesity can be detrimental to the livelihood of our pets,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and chief veterinary medical officer for Nationwide. “Pet owners need to be aware of the quality and amount of food or treats they give their furry family members. The New Year presents a perfect opportunity to create regular exercise routines for our pets and begin to effectively manage their eating habits to avoid excess weight gain. Scheduling routine wellness exams with your veterinarian is the most effective way to get started on monitoring your pet’s weight, particularly for cats.”

    In 2015, Nationwide received more than 49,000 pet insurance claims for arthritis in canines, the most common disease aggravated by excessive weight, which carried an average treatment fee of $295 per pet. With more than 5,000 pet insurance claims, bladder or urinary tract disease was the most common obesity-related condition in cats, which had an average claim amount of $442 per pet.

    Below are simple steps you can take to help regulate your pet’s weight:

    • Avoid feeding your pet table scraps.
    • Keep a consistent diet by monitoring the amount of food you give your pet.
    • Regulate the amount of treats you give your pet.
    • Establish a healthy and fun exercise schedule.

    *Consult your veterinarian to best determine your pet’s weight loss protocol.

    *Source courtesy of Pet Age

  • How to Put the Brakes on Pet Car Sickness

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    With summer travel right around the corner, many of us plan on hitting the road with our pooches for a little summer fun.  However, for some four-legged family members, road trips can mean upset tummies.

    Queasiness in the car is not just a human problem. Dogs and puppies do sometimes experience motion sickness on car rides.  Unfortunately, car sickness can make any kind of pet travel a distressing ordeal for both dogs and their families.

    Car sickness doesn’t have to be a serious or lasting problem for your pet. With the right treatment, it can be mitigated, or even stopped altogether.

    There are several causes of car sickness in dogs and puppies. The most common include:

    • Immature ears. In puppies, the ear structures that regulate balance aren’t fully developed, which can cause them to be extra sensitive to motion sickness. Many dogs will outgrow car sickness as they age.
    • Stress. If traveling in the car has only led to unpleasant experiences for your dog – to vet exams, for example — he may literally be worried sick about the journey.
    • Self-conditioning. If your dog experienced nausea on his first car rides as a puppy, he may associate car rides with illness, and expect to get sick in the car.

    Car sickness doesn’t look like you might expect it to in dogs, and you might not even realize that this is the challenge you’re dealing with. Here are some symptoms to look out for:

    • Inactivity/lethargy
    • Restlessness
    • Excessive/repetitive yawning
    • Whining/crying
    • Hyper-salivation (drooling)
    • Vomiting

    If your dog is suffering from car sickness, symptoms will typically disappear within a few minutes after the car comes to a stop.

    Fortunately, there are a number of different methods available to help prevent and/or treat canine car sickness.

    1.  Increase His Comfort Level
    • Turn your dog so that he faces forward. Motion sickness is related to the brain’s ability to process movement. The less blurring movement he sees out the window, the better he might feel.
    • Keep your dog as close to the front seat as possible (but not in the front seat). The farther back in the car you go, the more you sense motion.
    • Opening the windows a crack. This brings in fresh air, which is soothing, and helps reduce air pressure.
    • Avoid feeding your dog for a few hours before a car trip.
    • Transport him in a travel crate. A crate will limit his view to the outside, and will help to keep any sickness he may have confined to a small space.
    • Keep the temperature low. Heat, humidity and stuffiness can exacerbate car sickness.
    • Distract him. Toys, soothing music, or just hearing you speak may help calm and distract a high-strung dog.
    • Take frequent breaks. Getting out for fresh air or to stretch your legs can help him feel better periodically.
    • Exercise before your car ride.
    1.  Reconditioning  For dogs who have negative associations with riding in cars, reconditioning could be the answer. Reconditioning does take time and patience, but it really can help relax your dog.
    • Drive in a different vehicle.  Your dog might associate a specific vehicle with unpleasant memories.
    • Take short car trips to places your dog enjoys. This will replace negative associations with positive ones.
    • Gradually acclimate your dog to the car. Start by sitting with your dog in the car while the engine is off each day for a few days.  When he seems comfortable, let it idle. Once he is used to that, drive slowly around the block. Gradually progress to longer and longer trips until your dog seems comfortable driving anywhere.
    • Offer your dog treats, or offer him a special toy that’s just for car rides. This will make the car a fun and rewarding place to be.
    1.  Medication While motion sickness can be helped in natural ways for some dogs, there are cases in which medications is the only option. There are both over-the-counter and prescription medications available, including:
    • Anti-nausea drugs: reduce nausea and vomiting.
    • Antihistamines: lessen motion sickness, reduce drooling, and calm nerves.
    • Phenothiazine: reduces vomiting and helps sedate the dog.

    Caution: Always discuss any medications you plan to give your pet with your veterinarian to ensure that your dog is healthy enough to take them, will be given the correct dosage, and won’t suffer any adverse effects.

    1.  Holistic Approach  Holistic treatments are another way to go for dog parents. They really can be effective, and are worth trying.  Some common holistic choices include:
    • Ginger. Ginger is used to treat nausea. Try giving your dog ginger snap cookies or ginger pills at least 30 minutes before travel.
    • Peppermint, chamomile and horehound naturally help calm the stomach and nerves of your dog. These are available in pills and teas.
    • Massage can help sooth and relax your pet before you travel.

    As with other medications, always discuss any holistic remedies you plan to give your pet with your vet to ensure that it’s appropriate and the dosage is correct.

    In short, with some patience, training, or the right medications or holistic treatments, you and your dog will be able to ride safely and happily together anywhere you need to go!

    *Source courtesy of TripsWithPets.com

    About TripsWithPets.com
    TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear.

  • The Keys to a Healthy Pet

    You’re a proactive pet parent. You want to ensure that your pet is living the highest quality of life possible. You’ve already taken the first step by becoming a fan of Oxbow and feeding your pet the most nutritious and delicious hay and food pellets available on the market! Give yourself a high five! No, we mean it. Give yourself a high five.

    All set?

    Now we can get down to business. Nutrition doesn’t stop with hay and pellets. Supporting your pet’s health and well-being can be a daunting task, but we know that you’re up for the challenge. Here are just a few things that you can do to help your pet become their healthiest, happiest selves.

    1. Offer a balanced diet based on your species.

    2. Just like a cat or dog, small herbivores also need yearly checkups with an exotic-savvy vet! Vets can stop asymptomatic issues from becoming problematic and will check your pet’s weight and temperature to ensure that there aren’t any issues. There’s nothing better than a clean bill of health!

    3. Supplements are a great way to support your pet. Oxbow offers a fantastic line of Natural Science Supplements to support your pet’s immune system, joints, digestive system, skin and coat, and more. Click here to view our full line of hay-based, high-fiber supplements containing essential herbs and vitamins to help support your pet’s overall health.

    4. Enrichment and play time are vital to your pet’s wellbeing! Make sure to play and engage your pet every day. Let them out of their cage in a secure area where they are safe and free to explore. Click here for great tips on how to pet-proof your home from the American Humane Society!

    *Source courtesy of Oxbow Animal Health

  • The Do’s and Don’ts of Taking Your Pet Outside

    Autumn is upon us and the weather is finally cooling off! The mid-summer heat may have made outdoor excursions intolerable, if not impossible. Now that the weather is less hot and humid, you may find yourself in a position where you can share the outdoors with your pets and provide them with additional physical and mental enrichment.

    Infographic Pets Outside 2

    Please keep in mind that the great outdoors can also be stressful for a small animal that hasn’t been outside before. By starting off with short intervals outside, your furry companion will be able to better adjust to new sights, sounds, and smells.

    That being said, being outside can be a great opportunity for animals to exercise and explore. Your pet will greatly benefit from the physical, mental, and nutritional enrichment of being able to relax in their natural environment while engaging in behaviors such as grazing and foraging. Once proper precautions have been taken, your pet will undoubtedly enjoy the fresh air as much as you do!

    *Source courtesy of Oxbow Animal Health

  • Keeping Your Dog Hydrated

    5 DOs and DON’Ts For Pup Parents Whose Dogs Have A “Drinking Problem”

    5 DOs and DON’Ts For Pup Parents Whose Dogs Have A “Drinking Problem”

    Did you know that the summer heat often leads to dogs with drinking problems? And by “drinking problem,” I mean being so thirsty that they’ll drink water wherever they can find it.

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    Pet hydration is super important, maybe even more important for pups than people since 80% of a dog’s body is made up of water—whereas we mere humans are only made up of 60% water.

    Thirsty dog tongue underwater

    But if access to water is super important, then access to CLEAN water is super duperimportant. Quenching your dog’s thirst with standing, stagnant water only introduces risk into your efforts to hydrate your dog. Water that rests in one place is a virtual love den for bacteria and invites airborne debris like hair or dust to gather on its surface. Yuck!

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    So here are a few pro tips to prevent your pup from developing a drinking problem this summer:

    1.

    DON’T wait for your dog to try and tell you that they’re thirsty. Chances are you won’t approve of what they want to drink.

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    DO provide constant access to water indoors and out. Your dog needs one ounce of water per pound of body weight everyday.

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    2.

    DON’T let their water supply get gross, or else they’ll go looking for it someplace else!

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    DO change out the water regularly to ensure freshness. Getting a PetSafe Drinkwell® Sedona Fountain is a great way to keep your pup’s water clean, since its free-flowing circulation discourages bacterial growth—and makes drinking a blast for your pup!

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    3.

    DON’T let their water bowl get so gross that they turn to the toilet bowl. Oh, and put the lid down. (Gentlemen, we’re looking at you here.)

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    DO wash your dog’s water bowl everyday, that is, if you don’t have already have PetSafe Drinkwell® Pet Fountain. Otherwise daily cleaning is the best way to guarantee your dog’s bowl is absolutely bacteria free.

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    4.

    DON’T depend on the kindness of strangers. Even though some businesses are cool enough to provide a little liquid for your dog, there’s no guarantee clean water will be waiting where you plan to go. And who knows where that water’s been?

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    DO bring fresh water with you wherever you go with your dog. It’s the best way to be sure they’ll stay hydrated.

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    5.

    DON’T ignore the symptoms of dehydration if you suspect your dog shows them. Lethargy, loss of appetite, and deep, sunken eyes are all serious indicators that your dog has grown dangerously thirsty and needs to see the vet, stat.

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    So DO yourself a favor: simplify how you quench your dog’s thirst with fresh water and get them a PetSafe Drinkwell® Pagoda Fountain.

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    There’s no cleaner, healthier alternative.

    *Source courtesy of Petsafe

  • 10 Tips to Protect Your Dog’s Paws from Hot Pavement

    Many owners like taking their dogs on walks to enjoy the warm summer weather with them, but many of them forget about one important detail: hot pavement can and will burn a dog’s paws. It can be tempting to take your dog everywhere you go, but it can cause serious harm to your dog  if you are not careful. Remember that if asphalt and cement can get hot enough to cook an egg during the summer or if it feels way too hot for you to leave your hands comfortably on the ground for at least 10 seconds,  it can result in nasty burns on your dog’s paw pads.  This is especially true if you have a new puppy with tender young paws.

    So what can be done to protect your dog’s paws? Here are 10 tips to keep your dog or puppy from getting burned this summer.

    1. Walk Your Dog When It’s Cool

    This is probably an obvious tip but one that folks sometimes don’t consider enough. It’s a great idea to take your dog out on daily walks, but be mindful of when and where you walk him. The best time to walk your dog is in the morning or late evening, when the pavement is cool. Avoid walking your dog in the afternoon when the sun is high in the sky or early evening, because the pavement will be hot.

    2. Toughen Your Dog’s Paws

    When it’s time to walk your dog, it can actually be a good idea to stick to the pavement during the cool times of the day. While the pavement is cool, it won’t burn your dog’s paws, and it will also help to toughen them up. This will help to prevent any potential burns that could come later on.

    3. Stay On The Grass

    If you end up taking your dog out during the warmer times of the day, be sure to stay on the grass and stick to shady areas. Stay away from sidewalks or any paved areas to avoid burning. A shady park can be a great place to take your dog on a warm afternoon.


    Source

    4. Moisturize Your Dog’s Paws

    Consider moisturizing your dog’s feet daily to help prevent injuries like cuts, cracking, or peeling of the paws. Minor injuries like this can make your dog’s paws more susceptible to burns and other serious problems. Moisturizing paw pad creams like Cain & Able Moisturizing Paw Rub can work wonders.


    5. Use Paw Wax

    Paw wax can easily be smeared onto your dog’s paw pads to protect them from harmful surfaces. Paw wax is designed to protect your dog’s feet from hot surfaces and potentially harmful chemicals like road salts. Try Musher’s Secret Paw Wax if you go out with your dog frequently . It’s my favorite solution for keeping my dog comfortable whenever I need to take my dog out under tough road conditions. It’s a great solution for anytime your dog needs some extra paw protection. You can see a product review video for Musher’s Secret at the end of our article. (If you need something right away, you can try some Vaseline. It is not nearly as good but better than nothing.)

    6. Try Dog Shoes

    Dog shoes are one of the best ways to protect your dog’s paws from heat and potential injuries if your dog will wear them. If this seems like the right solution for your dog, be sure to buy shoes like Ultra Paws Rugged Dog Boot or My Busy Dog Shoes that have rubber soles to offer the best protection. Be aware that not all dogs can get used to dog shoes, and some might have a hard time walking in them. There will definitely be an adjustment period for your dog with dog shoes. If you can get your dog used to using them, nothing else offers better protection.

    7. Consider Disposable Dog Booties

    Disposable dog booties are a great short-term fix for the summer heat. Dog booties like Pawz Disposable Booties can provide good protection from the heat, and are a great temporary solution if you need to take your dog out on a hot day and your dog is willing to wear them.

    8. See If Peel And Stick Pads Can Work

    Peel and stick felt pads are a quick solution to minimize the dangers of hot pavement. They’re easy to stick onto the pads of your dog’s feet and they help protect against potential burns and injuries. They can even reduce the risks of your dog  slipping on slick surfaces. (Yes, I am talking about the felt pads you find in the home improvement stores like these.) Just buy or cut them to the size you need and paste them on your dog’s paws.

    And even better alternative to the felt pads may be silicone scar pads or tape. They are so easy to put on and they can be cut to the perfect size for paws. They can be reused and they do well and stay on in wet conditions. They are so thin, flexible and durable that your dogs should not have any problems wearing them unlike many other things you put on their paws. Silcone scar sheets can be a terrific option for your dog’s paws.  I’ve tried and liked the Scar Away Sheets but there are less expensive ones also available here. Just be careful on smooth floors as they can be a little slippery depending on which of the tapes you get.

    9. Grab Some Socks For His Paws

    Socks are a decent last minute solution if you need to take your dog onto the hot pavement. Like dog shoes, not every dog will tolerate wearing socks. You can just take a pair of your old socks or little baby socks and see if they will work. Or you can buy these ridiculously cute dog socks. (These are for indoors, but these adorable dog socks are so cute too). You should be watchful when putting socks on your dog’s feet, as some dogs will be tempted to chew them.

    10. Wash And Check His Paws Carefully

    Be sure to check your dog’s paw pads daily for any signs of damage and wash his paws frequently. If you do happen to see a problem, or if your dog is acting strangely on his feet, be sure to have him taken to the vet to see how bad the injury is.  If you wash and moisturize his paws at the same time you check his paws, you’re doing three things to help protect your dog’s paws at once. Saving time…and saving paws!

    Here’s a great reminder chart from the Humane Society of when it can be too hot for your dog’s feet.

    These 10 tips will help your dog stay safe and uninjured this summer from the dangers of hot pavement. Be sure to keep a close eye on the dog to protect him from any other heat related injuries as well. Make sure you watch for Symptoms of Heat Stroke In Dogs. Also,  consider these 12 Quick Tips For Keeping Your Dog Cool In Summer.

    As mentioned earlier, here’s a product review video for Musher’s Secret if you’re interested.  You can buy the paw protection wax here and I can’t recommend it highly enough.

    These tips on keeping your doggie’s paws protected and a great life vest for your dogif you are heading for the water should keep your buddy safer and more comfortable this summer. Happy Summer!

    *Source Courtesy of Petslady

  • Products That Make It Easy to Include Your Furry in Travel and Outdoor Recreation

    As the weather warms and vacation season unfolds, many will be planning more frequent outdoor excursions and even perhaps more long-term getaways. Of course, pet owners are no different, and research shows that pet owners frequently opt to take their pets along as travel companions rather than leaving them at home. According to a survey conducted by the travel application TripIt, 87 percent of respondents would love to travel with their pets and are often looking for ways to make such trips plausible. Pet retailers and manufacturers alike have an opportunity to present pet owners with convenient and safe solutions for all of their travel needs.

    Companion Care on the Go

    An increased focus on fitness and health has been a strong human lifestyle trend as of late, and the premiumization of food and other products both in human and animal sectors has been underway for some time. According to a report produced by the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station, changes in the frequency with which Americans participate in outdoor recreational activities were apparent in 2010.

    “Our research shows that not only are more Americans participating in outdoor recreation, the number of times they participated in many of the outdoor activities surveyed has grown,” said Ken Cordell, author and lead researcher for the study.

    Data showed that a certain category of outdoor activity in particular has seen increased popularity—namely, nature photography and viewing and appreciating the natural world, in general. For individuals who yearn for fresh air and warm sun in the company of their pets, pet products designed for easy travel are essential.

    Yummy Travel Bowls from Sleepypod provide pet owners newfound convenience in pet travel with its three-in-one design for storing, transporting and serving pet food and water simultaneously. Water and wet or dry pet food can be transported and served without worry about mixing or spilling. The bowl is baby-safe, FDA food grade and made from BPA-free silicone that is freezer, dishwasher and microwave safe.

    “Sleepypod is transforming conventional pet products into versatile, multi-purpose products that are stylish at the same time,” says Michael Leung, Sleepypod’s lead product designer and co-founder. “Pet owners are traveling more often with their pets and they require streamlined products that go from home to destination, whether it’s the hotel room or the office, with minimal fuss and effort. Yummy Travel Bowls are a natural evolution of Sleepypod’s pet travel product line. Much like our Sleepypod mobile pet bed or Sleepypod Air pet carrier, we’ve taken a single purpose item and turned it into a multi-purpose product.”

    The Petmate Travel Bowl Duo is a two-piece collapsible bowl set that allows pet owners to travel with their companions without sacrificing space. It is made from durable, dishwasher-safe silicone and is easy to clean. Similarly, Kurgo’s Collaps-a-Bowl is just about an inch thick when collapsed, allowing easy storage in a backpack or vehicle. It holds up to 24 ounces of fluid and is made of BPA-free, dishwasher-safe material.

    The SturdiBox is waterproof and durable, built for home and travel use. It is foldable, portable and lightweight, and holds up to a half-gallon of liquid. Just a few of the hundreds of potential uses for pets include litter, food and water transportation.

    While bringing pets on nature hikes or road trips may seem relatively simple, the number of items essential to care for a pet on the go is easy to overlook. Such additional items to carry can make travel with pets bothersome.
    Combatting this issue is the Baxter Dog Backpack from Kurgo, which is lightweight and provides a custom fit to dogs of any size with eight different adjustable points and two bag sizes available. A rear-mounted leash hook allows the backpack to act as a harness and the ergonomic padded design provides weight distribution for the backpack’s two saddlebags. Pet owners can easily transport food, treats, toy, first-aid supplies and travel bowls with added safety provided by a large handle in case dogs must be guided over environmental obstacles or extracted from water.

    “Kurgo is dedicated to creating innovative, stylish and high-quality pet travel products that allow families and pets to experience adventures together, wherever life takes them,” said Gordie Spater, chief business officer of Kurgo. “Whether it’s an outdoor excursion or running errands in town, Kurgo’s extensive travel and outdoor line offers a diverse selection of products to encourage pets and people to go together.”

    For pet owners who plan to take their furry friends along on their trips to the lake or beach this summer, safety is of the utmost importance. While many dogs have an instinctive knowledge to paddle in water, it is important to take safety precautions when near bodies of water.

    “Our AKC Pet flotation vest is designed to protect your pet with comfort and style,” said Debbie Viney, an account executive with BH Pet Gear, manufacturer of AKC products. “Adjustable straps and the construction allows for a comfortably snug fit. Reflective straps make your pet easy to see in the water. The flotation vest is designed to prevent your pet from rolling and sinking underwater.”

    According to AKC, makers of the pet flotation vests, most dogs sink when they are submerged despite a seemingly instinctive ability to paddle once in a body of water. Because of this, pet owners underestimate the danger of trips even to a pool and are urged to be prepared with a life vest.

    “Not all pets are natural swimmers, so it’s best to avoid risk with the protection of the AKC flotation vest,” Viney said. “We designed this flotation vest with the high standards that you would expect from the AKC brand. BH Pet Gear’s mission is to make quality, stylish products to consumers at an affordable price.”

    Another option is Kurgo’s Surf-N-Turf Dog Life Jacket. It comfortably fits active dogs with a removable flotation layer that can double as a raincoat. Metal rings allow for leash attachments, two transverse handles help owners control or extract pets from water, and the jacket’s reflective trim provides added visibility at all times.

    A Leg up on Car Travel

    Many animals need help getting in and out of vehicles, particularly small breeds that research shows are becoming more popular among American households. Attachable ramps and step sets are an easy solution.

    “Ramps are a great way to get dogs in and out of the back of an SUV, but they can be a little difficult to deploy and store,” said Patrick Hoffman, president of Solvit Products. “The PupSTEP HitchSTEP is an easy solution to this problem. Simply slide it into a hitch receiver and you instantly have a two-step stair that conveniently folds up and out of the way when not in use.”

    Tested to hold up to 200 pounds, the PupSTEP HitchSTEP is a steel construction step attachment that allows pets easier access to vehicles. Its two wide steps allow dogs to climb in and out of cars and is adjustable for vehicles of varying sizes. Weighing less than 20 pounds, the apparatus folds up and out of the way without inhibiting vehicle lift gates or can be stored in a vehicle after the steps are removed.

    Once inside the vehicle, pets often create wear and tear on car interiors. To combat this issue, there is Solvit’s latest product: the Car Cuddler.

    “Traveling with dogs can be great fun for everyone, but it can be a little rough on a car’s interior,” Hoffman said. “The Car Cuddler solves this problem by covering the car seat while it also provides dogs with a bolstered plush bed on which they can relax and nap.”

    Both a seat cover and pet bed, the Car Cuddler protects car seats from pet hair and dirty paws and is held firmly in place by multiple connection points. When paired with the Solvit Deluxe Vehicle Safety Harness, pets are kept safe while traveling in comfort.

    In fact, Solvit offers several products that make traveling with pets a comfortable, safe and worry-free experience. For example, the Premium Seat Cover is designed to protect the seat and seat back of a bench seat from pet hair and stains with new Smart Fit construction that allows a snugger fit. The Deluxe Hammock Seat Cover is a quilted cover that stretches from the front seat headrest to the back seat headrest to protect the entire rear floor and seat of a vehicle.

    “A car or an SUV is a big investment that should be protected,” Hoffman said. “If you enjoy traveling with your dog but want to protect that investment then you definitely should consider one of these seat covers.”

    The Heather Pattern Bench Seat Cover from Kurgo protects cars’ interiors with its waterproof, stain resistant and machine washable material that stays in place with front and rear attachments. It also provides extra storage room with two large pockets.

    “Most recently, we’ve launched some fresh new styles in our car seat protection line, specifically the Heather Collection,” Spater said. “We are constantly upping our game in car safety protection, and are thrilled to have recently launched the Impact Harness that is tested for dogs up to 130 pounds.

    Petmate’s Ultimate Travel Harness provides safety and comfort during travel with its plush comfort chest padding. The Metal seat belt clip is adjustable and connects to vehicles’ seat belt systems to keep pets fastened to the back seat of their owners’ cars. The company’s Booster Seats give pets the ability to see out of the windows of a vehicle while keeping them safe and secure during rides. The booster seat includes headrest and seat anchors, adjustable tether and metal supports.

    “Our award winning pet travel line was developed with Petmate’s 50-plus years of experience traveling thousands of miles with pets,” said Patricia McCune, senior product manager of soft goods at Petmate. “The diverse line demonstrates our commitment to innovation with a visionary, creative-yet-practical approach to pet product manufacturing.”

    Safety and Shelter

    For overnight trips or destination lounging, portable shelters may provide pets with a shady place to relax after a long drive, protection from the elements or somewhere to sleep.

    The Petmate Zip N Go Pet Bed easily folds up, zips closed and can be carried by its durable handle straps. The bed includes external pockets for additional storage space and a microfiber exterior and soft fleece interior for durability and comfort.

    The See and Extend Carrier from Petmate includes an extra side vestibule and nine inches of extra space, allowing pets to relax once a destination has been reached. Pet owners can store toys and treats in the carrier’s side pockets and the coated mesh construction provides both safety and comfort. Pets can easily access the carrier through its top and side and are kept secure in the car seat by exterior seat belt loops.

    Produced by Sturdi Products, the Single Car-Go makes it convenient for pet owners to bring their pet’s home on the road. Designed to fit in the backseat of most cars and SUVs, the Single Car-Go pops open once removed from its case and shaken, making it useful in hotels as well. Pets enter through the double zippered front door or a smaller side door entry that can be used with a Large SturdiBag for extra room. Interior rings are available for an optional hammock or pet toys and the Car-Go includes a built in storage pocket and clear vinyl water bottle pocket with grommet for a spout.

    “More and more pet owners are taking their animal companions along with them when they travel, and the resources available for finding pet-friendly places to stay, eat and play are growing,” said Penny Johnson, CEO of Sturdi Products. “At Sturdi Products, we feel designing unique, attractive, durable and adaptable products are essential for safe, comfortable and happy travels for both pet and pet owner. As more pet families are hitting the road with pets—dogs and cats—it’s our mission to continue to create the best travel products and accessories available.”

    *Source Courtesy of Petage