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  • 5 Ways to Keep Your Pet’s Teeth and Gums Healthy for Life

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    February is Dental Health Month, which means it’s time to lavish some attention on your pet’s teeth. It’s important to take proper care of canine and feline teeth, because if left untreated, plaque and tartar buildup can progress to painful periodontal disease. The bacteria from periodontal disease can spread to other organs and cause illnesses. More than 85 percent of cats and dogs over four years old are affected by periodontal disease — you don’t want your four-legged companion to become part of that alarming statistic.

    Here are five steps to help your pet’s teeth and gums remain healthy:

    1. Beware of Bad Breath
    If a musky scent is coming from Fluffy’s mouth, don’t ignore it. This could be a warning sign that she has periodontal disease or another oral disease such as stomatitis, a common feline condition that causes painful inflammation of the gums and mouth tissues.

    Other dental-health warning signs include bleeding gums, yellow or brown teeth, pawing at the mouth, and loose or missing teeth.

    2. Brush Your Pet’s Teeth
    While it might be difficult at first, with enough patience and plenty of yummy rewards, you can turn tooth brushing into a bonding experience with your dog or cat. It might take several weeks to train your four-legged friend to warm up to the toothbrush, so start by letting her smell the toothbrush and pet toothpaste, then gradually work your way to brushing for 30 seconds on each side of her mouth at least every other day. By the way, human toothpaste isn’t safe for pets, so be sure to use a product approved for your pet.

    If you’re scared your dog or cat will bite you, ask your veterinarian for alternative tartar-control options.

    3. Consider Dental Toys, Treats and Food
    While it’s not as effective as brushing your pet’s teeth, giving her treats, toys and food specifically designed to promote oral health will help her maintain healthy gums and teeth. Check for the Seal of Acceptance from the Veterinary Oral Health Council to make sure that whatever alternative you choose meets the standards for effective plaque and tartar control.

    4. Ask Your Vet for a Dental Exam
    Humans aren’t the only ones who need their chompers checked by a professional; your four-legged friend needs to have her teeth and gums checked by a veterinarian. During the dental exam, the vet will first take your pet’s medical history, then ask if you’ve noticed any dental health warning signs such as bad breath. Next, he’ll examine your pet, including checking the head and neck for any abnormalities. Finally, he’ll check out your pet’s teeth and gums for redness, bleeding and inflammation. He’ll also be on the lookout for tooth loss, cracked teeth, plaque and tartar, as well as potentially cancerous lumps and bumps.

    A cursory dental exam can usually be performed without sedation, unless your pet becomes aggressive or his teeth are very painful. For a complete dental evaluation, though, your pet will have to go under.

    5. Don’t Let Anesthesia Stop You From Getting a Dental Cleaning
    To thoroughly examine your pet’s teeth and gums, properly get rid of nasty plaque and tartar, and really clean your pet’s pearly whites, he’ll need to be anesthetized. Though sedating your dog or cat sounds scary, it’s not as bad as it sounds — in fact, the procedure has never been safer or more comfortable. Before your vet even begins anesthesia, he may recommend prescreening tests to help ensure that your pet is healthy enough for the procedure.

    When you think about it, the benefits of dental cleaning outweigh the possible risks of anesthesia. When Fluffy wakes up, her breath will smell better, and her teeth will be shinier and healthier. And as an extra bonus, maintaining healthy teeth and gums helps protect the body’s other organs, like the heart and kidneys, from the damaging effects of dental disease.

    *Source courtesy of Vet Street

  • Pet Obesity on the Rise for Sixth Straight Year

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    One of America’s most common New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, and statistics show that pet owners should share that goal with their dogs and cats. Data from Nationwide, the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance, reveals that pet obesity is on the rise for the sixth straight year. In 2015, Nationwide members filed 1.3 million pet insurance claims for conditions and diseases related to pet obesity, equaling a sum of more than $60 million in veterinary expenses. The boost in total obesity-related claims signifies a 23 percent growth over the last three years.

    Similar to their human counterparts, excessive body fat increases the risk of preventable health issues and may shorten the life expectancy of dogs and cats. Nationwide recently sorted through its database of more than 585,000 insured pets to determine the top 10 dog and cat obesity-related conditions. Below are the results:

    Most Common Dog Obesity-Related Conditions Most Common Cat Obesity-Related Conditions
    1.    Arthritis 1.     Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease
    2.   Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease 2.    Chronic Kidney Disease
    3.   Low Thyroid Hormone Production 3.    Diabetes
    4.   Liver Disease 4.    Asthma
    5.   Torn Knee Ligaments 5.    Liver Disease
    6.   Diabetes 6.    Arthritis
    7.   Diseased Disc in the Spine 7.    High Blood Pressure
    8.  Chronic Kidney Disease 8.   Heart Failure
    9.   Heart Failure 9.    Gall Bladder Disorder
    10.  Fatty Growth 10.   Immobility of Spine

    “Obesity can be detrimental to the livelihood of our pets,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and chief veterinary medical officer for Nationwide. “Pet owners need to be aware of the quality and amount of food or treats they give their furry family members. The New Year presents a perfect opportunity to create regular exercise routines for our pets and begin to effectively manage their eating habits to avoid excess weight gain. Scheduling routine wellness exams with your veterinarian is the most effective way to get started on monitoring your pet’s weight, particularly for cats.”

    In 2015, Nationwide received more than 49,000 pet insurance claims for arthritis in canines, the most common disease aggravated by excessive weight, which carried an average treatment fee of $295 per pet. With more than 5,000 pet insurance claims, bladder or urinary tract disease was the most common obesity-related condition in cats, which had an average claim amount of $442 per pet.

    Below are simple steps you can take to help regulate your pet’s weight:

    • Avoid feeding your pet table scraps.
    • Keep a consistent diet by monitoring the amount of food you give your pet.
    • Regulate the amount of treats you give your pet.
    • Establish a healthy and fun exercise schedule.

    *Consult your veterinarian to best determine your pet’s weight loss protocol.

    *Source courtesy of Pet Age

  • How to Put the Brakes on Pet Car Sickness

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    With summer travel right around the corner, many of us plan on hitting the road with our pooches for a little summer fun.  However, for some four-legged family members, road trips can mean upset tummies.

    Queasiness in the car is not just a human problem. Dogs and puppies do sometimes experience motion sickness on car rides.  Unfortunately, car sickness can make any kind of pet travel a distressing ordeal for both dogs and their families.

    Car sickness doesn’t have to be a serious or lasting problem for your pet. With the right treatment, it can be mitigated, or even stopped altogether.

    There are several causes of car sickness in dogs and puppies. The most common include:

    • Immature ears. In puppies, the ear structures that regulate balance aren’t fully developed, which can cause them to be extra sensitive to motion sickness. Many dogs will outgrow car sickness as they age.
    • Stress. If traveling in the car has only led to unpleasant experiences for your dog – to vet exams, for example — he may literally be worried sick about the journey.
    • Self-conditioning. If your dog experienced nausea on his first car rides as a puppy, he may associate car rides with illness, and expect to get sick in the car.

    Car sickness doesn’t look like you might expect it to in dogs, and you might not even realize that this is the challenge you’re dealing with. Here are some symptoms to look out for:

    • Inactivity/lethargy
    • Restlessness
    • Excessive/repetitive yawning
    • Whining/crying
    • Hyper-salivation (drooling)
    • Vomiting

    If your dog is suffering from car sickness, symptoms will typically disappear within a few minutes after the car comes to a stop.

    Fortunately, there are a number of different methods available to help prevent and/or treat canine car sickness.

    1.  Increase His Comfort Level
    • Turn your dog so that he faces forward. Motion sickness is related to the brain’s ability to process movement. The less blurring movement he sees out the window, the better he might feel.
    • Keep your dog as close to the front seat as possible (but not in the front seat). The farther back in the car you go, the more you sense motion.
    • Opening the windows a crack. This brings in fresh air, which is soothing, and helps reduce air pressure.
    • Avoid feeding your dog for a few hours before a car trip.
    • Transport him in a travel crate. A crate will limit his view to the outside, and will help to keep any sickness he may have confined to a small space.
    • Keep the temperature low. Heat, humidity and stuffiness can exacerbate car sickness.
    • Distract him. Toys, soothing music, or just hearing you speak may help calm and distract a high-strung dog.
    • Take frequent breaks. Getting out for fresh air or to stretch your legs can help him feel better periodically.
    • Exercise before your car ride.
    1.  Reconditioning  For dogs who have negative associations with riding in cars, reconditioning could be the answer. Reconditioning does take time and patience, but it really can help relax your dog.
    • Drive in a different vehicle.  Your dog might associate a specific vehicle with unpleasant memories.
    • Take short car trips to places your dog enjoys. This will replace negative associations with positive ones.
    • Gradually acclimate your dog to the car. Start by sitting with your dog in the car while the engine is off each day for a few days.  When he seems comfortable, let it idle. Once he is used to that, drive slowly around the block. Gradually progress to longer and longer trips until your dog seems comfortable driving anywhere.
    • Offer your dog treats, or offer him a special toy that’s just for car rides. This will make the car a fun and rewarding place to be.
    1.  Medication While motion sickness can be helped in natural ways for some dogs, there are cases in which medications is the only option. There are both over-the-counter and prescription medications available, including:
    • Anti-nausea drugs: reduce nausea and vomiting.
    • Antihistamines: lessen motion sickness, reduce drooling, and calm nerves.
    • Phenothiazine: reduces vomiting and helps sedate the dog.

    Caution: Always discuss any medications you plan to give your pet with your veterinarian to ensure that your dog is healthy enough to take them, will be given the correct dosage, and won’t suffer any adverse effects.

    1.  Holistic Approach  Holistic treatments are another way to go for dog parents. They really can be effective, and are worth trying.  Some common holistic choices include:
    • Ginger. Ginger is used to treat nausea. Try giving your dog ginger snap cookies or ginger pills at least 30 minutes before travel.
    • Peppermint, chamomile and horehound naturally help calm the stomach and nerves of your dog. These are available in pills and teas.
    • Massage can help sooth and relax your pet before you travel.

    As with other medications, always discuss any holistic remedies you plan to give your pet with your vet to ensure that it’s appropriate and the dosage is correct.

    In short, with some patience, training, or the right medications or holistic treatments, you and your dog will be able to ride safely and happily together anywhere you need to go!

    *Source courtesy of TripsWithPets.com

    About TripsWithPets.com
    TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear.

  • The Keys to a Healthy Pet

    You’re a proactive pet parent. You want to ensure that your pet is living the highest quality of life possible. You’ve already taken the first step by becoming a fan of Oxbow and feeding your pet the most nutritious and delicious hay and food pellets available on the market! Give yourself a high five! No, we mean it. Give yourself a high five.

    All set?

    Now we can get down to business. Nutrition doesn’t stop with hay and pellets. Supporting your pet’s health and well-being can be a daunting task, but we know that you’re up for the challenge. Here are just a few things that you can do to help your pet become their healthiest, happiest selves.

    1. Offer a balanced diet based on your species.

    2. Just like a cat or dog, small herbivores also need yearly checkups with an exotic-savvy vet! Vets can stop asymptomatic issues from becoming problematic and will check your pet’s weight and temperature to ensure that there aren’t any issues. There’s nothing better than a clean bill of health!

    3. Supplements are a great way to support your pet. Oxbow offers a fantastic line of Natural Science Supplements to support your pet’s immune system, joints, digestive system, skin and coat, and more. Click here to view our full line of hay-based, high-fiber supplements containing essential herbs and vitamins to help support your pet’s overall health.

    4. Enrichment and play time are vital to your pet’s wellbeing! Make sure to play and engage your pet every day. Let them out of their cage in a secure area where they are safe and free to explore. Click here for great tips on how to pet-proof your home from the American Humane Society!

    *Source courtesy of Oxbow Animal Health

  • Pet Travel: Take Your Furry Sidekick  Along, or Leave Him Behind?

    Adorable and soulful labrador mix ready to take the old car for a drive.

    As a pet parent, a road trip with a furry kid might seem like a dream come true. You’d love the opportunity to bond and share new experiences with him, and you’d certainly appreciate the company. But before you load your beloved pet into the car for the long haul, take a moment to reflect. A pet who’s a great companion at home, on walks, and on short trips around town won’t necessarily be an ideal travel buddy. Long trips aren’t right for every pet, and your pet’s needs should come before your desire to take him along.

    Does My Pet have a Road-Worthy Temperament?

    Like people, dogs have a wide range of different temperaments. Some are laid-back and easygoing, while others are nervous and high-strung. If your pet is adaptable, easy to please and likes new places and new people, he’s likely to be a great travel buddy.  However, if he’s nervous by nature, skittish about car rides, or anxious when confronted with something new, chances are, he’s not ready for a long trip. If your pet is nervous or fearful, don’t despair – with some training, he may eventually become a great pet traveler. He just may have to stay home this time around.

    With appropriate training, commitment,  and patience, most temperament problems can be overcome. Your pet can become less sensitive to stimuli, and more suited for travel. That said, desensitizing training techniques aren’t a quick fix. You’ll need to dedicate the time, offer a lot of leeway and understanding, and let your pet set the pace.

    Will This Trip be Fun for my Pet?

    Will your pet be comfortable? Did you plan pet friendly activities he will enjoy? Your dog might love an impromptu hiking trip through the mountains or a glorious day on the beach, but he may not be so thrilled to share your mother’s tiny apartment with her cats while you head off to the golf course or sit alone in a hotel room  during your out-of-town business meetings, (in fact, many pet friendly hotels don’t allow pets to stay alone in rooms). You know your dog best, so you are the best person to judge whether this trip will be an enjoyable one for him – if not, you can adjust your plans to be more pet friendly, or you can let him stay home where he’s sure to be comfortable.

    Is My Pet in Good Health?

    If your pet is injured or under-the-weather, you may be tempted to take him along on your trip so you can watch over him. After all, no one will care for him like you do! However, it may be best for your pet to stay behind under the care of trusted friend or family member. You will be busy driving, after all, and you won’t really keep vigil over him. The trip may make him tired, distressed or uncomfortable – factors that will be difficult to remedy far from home. A pet in pain or discomfort may even act out, which won’t make for a pleasant trip for either of you.

    If your pet is elderly, but in good health, you’ll need to make a judgment call. If he enjoys taking car trips and visiting new places, taking him along may very well be good for him. If he likes trips, but becomes uncomfortable easily, he may be better off at home. If you’re undecided, a quick trip to consult with your vet can help you figure out whether a road trip is in your pet’s best interest.

    If your pet suffers from travel anxiety, routinely taking him on brief trips, or planning occasional trips that end up somewhere exciting and fun can help teach him that traveling is a rewarding experience. If your pet experiences motion sickness during car rides, all is not lost – a number of remedies exist to help alleviate his suffering, including reconditioning, traditional medications, and holistic remedies.

    If your pet is up for it, hitting the road with him can be a fantastic way to break up the blahs, have some fun adventures, and spend some quality time together. However, even if your pet isn’t perfectly suited for travel right now, it doesn’t mean he never can be.

    Safe travels and happy tails!

    *Source courtesy of TripsWithPets.com

    About TripsWithPets.com
    TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear.

  • The Do’s and Don’ts of Taking Your Pet Outside

    Autumn is upon us and the weather is finally cooling off! The mid-summer heat may have made outdoor excursions intolerable, if not impossible. Now that the weather is less hot and humid, you may find yourself in a position where you can share the outdoors with your pets and provide them with additional physical and mental enrichment.

    Infographic Pets Outside 2

    Please keep in mind that the great outdoors can also be stressful for a small animal that hasn’t been outside before. By starting off with short intervals outside, your furry companion will be able to better adjust to new sights, sounds, and smells.

    That being said, being outside can be a great opportunity for animals to exercise and explore. Your pet will greatly benefit from the physical, mental, and nutritional enrichment of being able to relax in their natural environment while engaging in behaviors such as grazing and foraging. Once proper precautions have been taken, your pet will undoubtedly enjoy the fresh air as much as you do!

    *Source courtesy of Oxbow Animal Health

  • Pets and Distracted Driving

    dog_driving

    With busy summer travel season in full force, many families are planning to hit the road with their families – and that of course, means their four-legged family members too. To ensure safe travels for everyone it’s important to take heed of a very real pet travel safety issue – pets and distracted driving.

    When we think of distracted driving, the typical “culprits” that come to mind include; texting, eating, applying makeup, chatting on the phone, or even daydreaming.  However, we seldom consider that traveling with an unsecured pet is a very real and dangerous distraction.

    AAA in conjunction with Kurgo conducted a survey of people who often drive with their pets. The survey showed that a whopping 64 percent of pet parents partake in unsafe distracted driving habits as they pertain to their pet.  Additionally, 29 percent of respondents admitted to being distracted by their four-legged travel companions, yet 84 percent indicated that they do not secure their pet in their vehicle. According to the survey, drivers were letting their dogs, putting them in their laps and giving them treats. Some drivers (three percent) even photographed their dogs while driving.

    It’s pretty easy to understand how an unsecured pet can be a distraction while driving. Some pets may become anxious or excited causing them to jump around or bark while in the vehicle. Additionally, a happy and loving pet may just want to be near you and crawl on your lap while driving.

    Oftentimes, pets can be frightened and there is always an element of unpredictability with any animal.  When looking for comfort dogs and cats may naturally opt to be near you and add to the possible perils caused by these distractions.

    Properly securing your pet in your vehicle is not only about alleviating this potential driving distraction that could cause an accident. It is also a proactive approach should there be an accident or sudden stop – even a fender bender can injure an unsecured pet. We wear seatbelts for our safety in case of an accident and should take the same care to secure our pets. A pet that is not restrained properly in a vehicle can be seriously harmed or even killed if thrown from a vehicle. Airbags can go off and injure a pet in your lap. In the event of an accident, frightened pets can easily escape from a vehicle and run off.  Further, a pet that is not properly secured may not only be harmed but could also put others in danger through the shear force of any impact from an accident.

    Ensuring your pet is safe while traveling in your vehicle means finding the pet safety restraint that is right for him. Options include pet seat belts, pet car seats, travel crates, and vehicle pet barriers. Planning to have the right pet safety restraint for your trip will not only keep you and your pet safe, but also offer you peace of mind and take one more distraction away.

    *Source courtesy of TripsWithPets.com

    About TripsWithPets.com
    TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear.

  • Keeping Your Dog Hydrated

    5 DOs and DON’Ts For Pup Parents Whose Dogs Have A “Drinking Problem”

    5 DOs and DON’Ts For Pup Parents Whose Dogs Have A “Drinking Problem”

    Did you know that the summer heat often leads to dogs with drinking problems? And by “drinking problem,” I mean being so thirsty that they’ll drink water wherever they can find it.

    petsafe13

    Pet hydration is super important, maybe even more important for pups than people since 80% of a dog’s body is made up of water—whereas we mere humans are only made up of 60% water.

    Thirsty dog tongue underwater

    But if access to water is super important, then access to CLEAN water is super duperimportant. Quenching your dog’s thirst with standing, stagnant water only introduces risk into your efforts to hydrate your dog. Water that rests in one place is a virtual love den for bacteria and invites airborne debris like hair or dust to gather on its surface. Yuck!

    les

    So here are a few pro tips to prevent your pup from developing a drinking problem this summer:

    1.

    DON’T wait for your dog to try and tell you that they’re thirsty. Chances are you won’t approve of what they want to drink.

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    DO provide constant access to water indoors and out. Your dog needs one ounce of water per pound of body weight everyday.

    petsafe1

    2.

    DON’T let their water supply get gross, or else they’ll go looking for it someplace else!

    petsafe8

    DO change out the water regularly to ensure freshness. Getting a PetSafe Drinkwell® Sedona Fountain is a great way to keep your pup’s water clean, since its free-flowing circulation discourages bacterial growth—and makes drinking a blast for your pup!

    petsafe2

    3.

    DON’T let their water bowl get so gross that they turn to the toilet bowl. Oh, and put the lid down. (Gentlemen, we’re looking at you here.)

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    DO wash your dog’s water bowl everyday, that is, if you don’t have already have PetSafe Drinkwell® Pet Fountain. Otherwise daily cleaning is the best way to guarantee your dog’s bowl is absolutely bacteria free.

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    4.

    DON’T depend on the kindness of strangers. Even though some businesses are cool enough to provide a little liquid for your dog, there’s no guarantee clean water will be waiting where you plan to go. And who knows where that water’s been?

    petsafe11

    DO bring fresh water with you wherever you go with your dog. It’s the best way to be sure they’ll stay hydrated.

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    5.

    DON’T ignore the symptoms of dehydration if you suspect your dog shows them. Lethargy, loss of appetite, and deep, sunken eyes are all serious indicators that your dog has grown dangerously thirsty and needs to see the vet, stat.

    petsafe10

    So DO yourself a favor: simplify how you quench your dog’s thirst with fresh water and get them a PetSafe Drinkwell® Pagoda Fountain.

    petsafe2

    There’s no cleaner, healthier alternative.

    *Source courtesy of Petsafe

  • 10 Tips to Protect Your Dog’s Paws from Hot Pavement

    Many owners like taking their dogs on walks to enjoy the warm summer weather with them, but many of them forget about one important detail: hot pavement can and will burn a dog’s paws. It can be tempting to take your dog everywhere you go, but it can cause serious harm to your dog  if you are not careful. Remember that if asphalt and cement can get hot enough to cook an egg during the summer or if it feels way too hot for you to leave your hands comfortably on the ground for at least 10 seconds,  it can result in nasty burns on your dog’s paw pads.  This is especially true if you have a new puppy with tender young paws.

    So what can be done to protect your dog’s paws? Here are 10 tips to keep your dog or puppy from getting burned this summer.

    1. Walk Your Dog When It’s Cool

    This is probably an obvious tip but one that folks sometimes don’t consider enough. It’s a great idea to take your dog out on daily walks, but be mindful of when and where you walk him. The best time to walk your dog is in the morning or late evening, when the pavement is cool. Avoid walking your dog in the afternoon when the sun is high in the sky or early evening, because the pavement will be hot.

    2. Toughen Your Dog’s Paws

    When it’s time to walk your dog, it can actually be a good idea to stick to the pavement during the cool times of the day. While the pavement is cool, it won’t burn your dog’s paws, and it will also help to toughen them up. This will help to prevent any potential burns that could come later on.

    3. Stay On The Grass

    If you end up taking your dog out during the warmer times of the day, be sure to stay on the grass and stick to shady areas. Stay away from sidewalks or any paved areas to avoid burning. A shady park can be a great place to take your dog on a warm afternoon.


    Source

    4. Moisturize Your Dog’s Paws

    Consider moisturizing your dog’s feet daily to help prevent injuries like cuts, cracking, or peeling of the paws. Minor injuries like this can make your dog’s paws more susceptible to burns and other serious problems. Moisturizing paw pad creams like Cain & Able Moisturizing Paw Rub can work wonders.


    5. Use Paw Wax

    Paw wax can easily be smeared onto your dog’s paw pads to protect them from harmful surfaces. Paw wax is designed to protect your dog’s feet from hot surfaces and potentially harmful chemicals like road salts. Try Musher’s Secret Paw Wax if you go out with your dog frequently . It’s my favorite solution for keeping my dog comfortable whenever I need to take my dog out under tough road conditions. It’s a great solution for anytime your dog needs some extra paw protection. You can see a product review video for Musher’s Secret at the end of our article. (If you need something right away, you can try some Vaseline. It is not nearly as good but better than nothing.)

    6. Try Dog Shoes

    Dog shoes are one of the best ways to protect your dog’s paws from heat and potential injuries if your dog will wear them. If this seems like the right solution for your dog, be sure to buy shoes like Ultra Paws Rugged Dog Boot or My Busy Dog Shoes that have rubber soles to offer the best protection. Be aware that not all dogs can get used to dog shoes, and some might have a hard time walking in them. There will definitely be an adjustment period for your dog with dog shoes. If you can get your dog used to using them, nothing else offers better protection.

    7. Consider Disposable Dog Booties

    Disposable dog booties are a great short-term fix for the summer heat. Dog booties like Pawz Disposable Booties can provide good protection from the heat, and are a great temporary solution if you need to take your dog out on a hot day and your dog is willing to wear them.

    8. See If Peel And Stick Pads Can Work

    Peel and stick felt pads are a quick solution to minimize the dangers of hot pavement. They’re easy to stick onto the pads of your dog’s feet and they help protect against potential burns and injuries. They can even reduce the risks of your dog  slipping on slick surfaces. (Yes, I am talking about the felt pads you find in the home improvement stores like these.) Just buy or cut them to the size you need and paste them on your dog’s paws.

    And even better alternative to the felt pads may be silicone scar pads or tape. They are so easy to put on and they can be cut to the perfect size for paws. They can be reused and they do well and stay on in wet conditions. They are so thin, flexible and durable that your dogs should not have any problems wearing them unlike many other things you put on their paws. Silcone scar sheets can be a terrific option for your dog’s paws.  I’ve tried and liked the Scar Away Sheets but there are less expensive ones also available here. Just be careful on smooth floors as they can be a little slippery depending on which of the tapes you get.

    9. Grab Some Socks For His Paws

    Socks are a decent last minute solution if you need to take your dog onto the hot pavement. Like dog shoes, not every dog will tolerate wearing socks. You can just take a pair of your old socks or little baby socks and see if they will work. Or you can buy these ridiculously cute dog socks. (These are for indoors, but these adorable dog socks are so cute too). You should be watchful when putting socks on your dog’s feet, as some dogs will be tempted to chew them.

    10. Wash And Check His Paws Carefully

    Be sure to check your dog’s paw pads daily for any signs of damage and wash his paws frequently. If you do happen to see a problem, or if your dog is acting strangely on his feet, be sure to have him taken to the vet to see how bad the injury is.  If you wash and moisturize his paws at the same time you check his paws, you’re doing three things to help protect your dog’s paws at once. Saving time…and saving paws!

    Here’s a great reminder chart from the Humane Society of when it can be too hot for your dog’s feet.

    These 10 tips will help your dog stay safe and uninjured this summer from the dangers of hot pavement. Be sure to keep a close eye on the dog to protect him from any other heat related injuries as well. Make sure you watch for Symptoms of Heat Stroke In Dogs. Also,  consider these 12 Quick Tips For Keeping Your Dog Cool In Summer.

    As mentioned earlier, here’s a product review video for Musher’s Secret if you’re interested.  You can buy the paw protection wax here and I can’t recommend it highly enough.

    These tips on keeping your doggie’s paws protected and a great life vest for your dogif you are heading for the water should keep your buddy safer and more comfortable this summer. Happy Summer!

    *Source Courtesy of Petslady