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  • Pets and Distracted Driving

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    With busy summer travel season in full force, many families are planning to hit the road with their families – and that of course, means their four-legged family members too. To ensure safe travels for everyone it’s important to take heed of a very real pet travel safety issue – pets and distracted driving.

    When we think of distracted driving, the typical “culprits” that come to mind include; texting, eating, applying makeup, chatting on the phone, or even daydreaming.  However, we seldom consider that traveling with an unsecured pet is a very real and dangerous distraction.

    AAA in conjunction with Kurgo conducted a survey of people who often drive with their pets. The survey showed that a whopping 64 percent of pet parents partake in unsafe distracted driving habits as they pertain to their pet.  Additionally, 29 percent of respondents admitted to being distracted by their four-legged travel companions, yet 84 percent indicated that they do not secure their pet in their vehicle. According to the survey, drivers were letting their dogs, putting them in their laps and giving them treats. Some drivers (three percent) even photographed their dogs while driving.

    It’s pretty easy to understand how an unsecured pet can be a distraction while driving. Some pets may become anxious or excited causing them to jump around or bark while in the vehicle. Additionally, a happy and loving pet may just want to be near you and crawl on your lap while driving.

    Oftentimes, pets can be frightened and there is always an element of unpredictability with any animal.  When looking for comfort dogs and cats may naturally opt to be near you and add to the possible perils caused by these distractions.

    Properly securing your pet in your vehicle is not only about alleviating this potential driving distraction that could cause an accident. It is also a proactive approach should there be an accident or sudden stop – even a fender bender can injure an unsecured pet. We wear seatbelts for our safety in case of an accident and should take the same care to secure our pets. A pet that is not restrained properly in a vehicle can be seriously harmed or even killed if thrown from a vehicle. Airbags can go off and injure a pet in your lap. In the event of an accident, frightened pets can easily escape from a vehicle and run off.  Further, a pet that is not properly secured may not only be harmed but could also put others in danger through the shear force of any impact from an accident.

    Ensuring your pet is safe while traveling in your vehicle means finding the pet safety restraint that is right for him. Options include pet seat belts, pet car seats, travel crates, and vehicle pet barriers. Planning to have the right pet safety restraint for your trip will not only keep you and your pet safe, but also offer you peace of mind and take one more distraction away.

    *Source courtesy of TripsWithPets.com

    About TripsWithPets.com
    TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear.

  • Keeping Your Dog Hydrated

    5 DOs and DON’Ts For Pup Parents Whose Dogs Have A “Drinking Problem”

    5 DOs and DON’Ts For Pup Parents Whose Dogs Have A “Drinking Problem”

    Did you know that the summer heat often leads to dogs with drinking problems? And by “drinking problem,” I mean being so thirsty that they’ll drink water wherever they can find it.

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    Pet hydration is super important, maybe even more important for pups than people since 80% of a dog’s body is made up of water—whereas we mere humans are only made up of 60% water.

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    But if access to water is super important, then access to CLEAN water is super duperimportant. Quenching your dog’s thirst with standing, stagnant water only introduces risk into your efforts to hydrate your dog. Water that rests in one place is a virtual love den for bacteria and invites airborne debris like hair or dust to gather on its surface. Yuck!

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    So here are a few pro tips to prevent your pup from developing a drinking problem this summer:

    1.

    DON’T wait for your dog to try and tell you that they’re thirsty. Chances are you won’t approve of what they want to drink.

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    DO provide constant access to water indoors and out. Your dog needs one ounce of water per pound of body weight everyday.

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    2.

    DON’T let their water supply get gross, or else they’ll go looking for it someplace else!

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    DO change out the water regularly to ensure freshness. Getting a PetSafe Drinkwell® Sedona Fountain is a great way to keep your pup’s water clean, since its free-flowing circulation discourages bacterial growth—and makes drinking a blast for your pup!

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    3.

    DON’T let their water bowl get so gross that they turn to the toilet bowl. Oh, and put the lid down. (Gentlemen, we’re looking at you here.)

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    DO wash your dog’s water bowl everyday, that is, if you don’t have already have PetSafe Drinkwell® Pet Fountain. Otherwise daily cleaning is the best way to guarantee your dog’s bowl is absolutely bacteria free.

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    4.

    DON’T depend on the kindness of strangers. Even though some businesses are cool enough to provide a little liquid for your dog, there’s no guarantee clean water will be waiting where you plan to go. And who knows where that water’s been?

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    DO bring fresh water with you wherever you go with your dog. It’s the best way to be sure they’ll stay hydrated.

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    5.

    DON’T ignore the symptoms of dehydration if you suspect your dog shows them. Lethargy, loss of appetite, and deep, sunken eyes are all serious indicators that your dog has grown dangerously thirsty and needs to see the vet, stat.

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    So DO yourself a favor: simplify how you quench your dog’s thirst with fresh water and get them a PetSafe Drinkwell® Pagoda Fountain.

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    There’s no cleaner, healthier alternative.

    *Source courtesy of Petsafe